Fall 2018

Introduction to research methods, statistical analysis, needs assessment, and program evaluation, including the importance of research in advancing the counseling profession; research methods such as qualitative, quantitative, single-case designs, action research, and outcome-based research; statistical methods used in conducting research and program evaluation; principles, models, and applications of needs assessment, program evaluation, and the use of findings to effect program modifications; the use of research to inform evidence-based practice; and ethical and culturally relevant strategies for interpreting and reporting the results of research and/or program evaluation studies.
An introduction to key issues in the psychology of religion including religious development in individuals, the social psychology of religious organizations, religious experience and mysticism, and mental health and religion. The course also introduces students to the work of influential theorists, such as Freud, Jung and William James. Students will become familiar with the application of psychological principles and research to religion in general, and to Paganism in particular. The course provides clergy with a basic understanding of psychology, which enhances later study.
What does it mean to be an ethical magical practitioner? How can you tell if a teacher or coven leader has good boundaries? When we step into leadership, how can we make sure we are doing right by our communities? This course is designed to help clarify our internal ethical code, and then apply it to the areas of Community, Service, Ritual, and Leadership. The poet and philosopher M.C. Richards wrote, “It takes a golden ear to be empty enough of itself to hear clearly.” We will approach the formation of healthy, rigorous ethics and boundaries in the spirit of deep listening and open conversation, and follow where it leads.